50 Wonderful Enlightening Quotes about the Statue of Liberty

Quotes about the Statue of Liberty

The statue of Liberty is a universal statue that connotes freedom to the world. This statue was a gift to the United States by the French people. The statue was meant to cement the good relationship between France and the United States. It is the actual symbol of freedom and democracy and the very admirable human values are derived from it.

Both Americans and Non-Americans treasure and value this statue as they perceive it as the bond and guide to human relations intended to bring about harmony in the universe. It is viewed as a national monument and was officially dedicated on October 28 in 1886. The following are 50 great quotes concerning the Statue of Liberty.

Quotes to Celebrate and Honor The Statue of Liberty

1. “The Statue of Liberty means everything. We take it for granted today. We take it for granted. Remember the Statue of Liberty stands for what America is. We as Democrats have to remind ourselves and remind the country of the great principles we stand for. This is a place of protection. This is not a country of bullies. We are not an empire. We are the light. We are the Statue of Liberty.”—Jerry Springer

2. “The last time I was inside a woman was when I went to the Statue of Liberty.”—Woody Allen

3. “The crime problem in New York is getting really serious. The other day the Statue of Liberty had both hands up.”—Jay Leno

4. “It’s not enough for the torch of liberty to be held up high only by one woman, every human must hold the torch up high in every corner of the world.”—Abhijit Naskar

5.  “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.”—Emma Lazarus

6.  “Liberty is too precious a thing to be buried in books. Humans should hold it up in their hands every single day of their lives and say from the deepest fathoms of their soul – “I am free – to think – to speak – to act – the way a real, novel, civilized being should – my ancestors couldn’t, but I can, and my children will.”—Abhijit Naskar

7. “People look at the Statue of Liberty and they see a proud symbol. Donald Trump looks at the Statue of Liberty and sees a four.”—Hillary Clinton

8.    “And you have to remember that I came to America as an immigrant. You know, on a ship, through the Statue of Liberty. And I saw that skyline, not just as a representation of steel and concrete and glass, but as really as the American Dream.”—Daniel Libeskind

9.    “From where I stood, the Statue of Liberty was a flourescent green fleck against the sky, and beyond her sat Ellis Island, the focus of so many myths; but it had been built too late for those early Africans – who weren’t immigrants in any case – and it had been closed too soon to mean anything to the later Africans like Kenneth, or the cabdriver, or me.”—Teju Cole

10.  “True meaning of America is not discrimination and segregation, it is equality and inclusion. And so long as that force of equality and inclusion runs through the veins of even ten Americans, no brainless bigot can succeed in poisoning the soul of our great land of liberty.”—Abhijit Naskar

11.  “As I looked up at the Statue of Liberty, I thought at that time, ‘What a wonderful country.”—Elaine Chao

12.  “What was moving, I think, was the fact that the statue is a woman and not a heroic, manly figure. So for all her scale and immensity, there’s something soft about the Statue of Liberty, something tender about her.”—Derek Walcott

13.    “A building can become an archetype, invisible, like for a New Yorker, for example, the Statue of Liberty. You look at it, and it disappears into the thousands of times you’ve already seen it.”—Chris Jordan

14.  Its magnificence was indescribable, and its magnitude was inconceivable. She felt overwhelmed in the presence of its greatness.”—Mona Rodriguez

15. “Living in New York City, I am reminded by the Statue of Liberty that the United States of America has always welcomed those yearning to breathe free and seek a better life.”—Charles B. Rangel

16.  “Out in the channel, the Statue of Liberty stood alone on her little island, her corroding flame held high in the air as the sun set over the industrial shoreline and skyways of New Jersey.”—Andrew Cotto

17. “Many of America’s and New York’s sons and daughters are around the world fighting for the freedoms that the Statue of Liberty stands for.”—Michael Bloomberg

18. “The first time I saw America was from my perch on the mast of a Spanish naval ship, where I could spot the Statue of Liberty reaching proudly into the open, endless American sky.”—Jose Andres

19. “Lady liberty is not just a statue, she is a reflection of the soul of America.”—Abhijit Naskar

20. “As Karl Rossmann, a poor boy of sixteen who had been packed off to America by his parents because a servant girl had seduced him and got herself with child by him, stood on the liner slowly entering the harbour of New York, a sudden burst of sunshine seemed to illumine the Statue of Liberty, so that he saw it in a new light, although he had sighted it long before. The arm with the sword rose up as if newly stretched aloft, and round the figure blew the free winds of heaven.”—Franz Kafka

21. “Thanks, Ms. Liberty! Is that a sari you’re wearing? I hope not.”—Mitali Perkins

22. “From where I stood, the Statue of Liberty was a flourescent green fleck against the sky, and beyond her sat Ellis Island, the focus of so many myths; but it had been built too late for those early Africans – who weren’t immigrants in any case – and it had been closed too soon to mean anything to the later Africans like Kenneth, or the cabdriver, or me.”—Teju Cole

23. “I recommend that the Statue of Liberty be supplemented by a Statue of Responsibility on the west coast.”—Viktor E.Frankl

24. “You sail into the harbor, and Staten Island is on your left, and then you see the Statue of Liberty. This is what everyone in the world has dreams of when they think about New York. And I thought, ‘My God, I’m in Heaven. I’ll be dancing down Fifth Avenue like Fred Astaire with Ginger Rogers.”—Frank McCourt

25.  “I don’t see any justification for the federal government owning land, other than the Statue of Liberty and maybe a few parks, maybe a few refuges. But to just own land to do nothing with it I think is a disservice to the Constitution.”—Don Young

26  “If you’re writing a book that takes place in New York in the moment, you can’t not write about 9-11; you can’t not integrate it. My main character’s view is the Statue of Liberty and the Trade Center. It doesn’t have to take over, but it has to be acknowledged.”—Richard Price

27.  ” I took a puff of the wrong cigarette at a fraternity dance once, and the cops had to get me, y’know. I broke two teeth trying to give a hickie to the Statue of Liberty.”—Woody Allen

28. “Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame, With conquering limbs astride from land to land; Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name Mother of exiles.”—Emma Lazarus

29. “Wouldn’t it be wonderful if the winning kid got up to the microphone and, in front of the world, had to dig into a pocket to pull out a crumpled sheet of paper containing the words that would move us all.”—David L. Wolper

30  “So for all her scale and immensity, there’s something soft about the Statue of Liberty, something tender about her.”—Derek Walcott

31. “She lifts her lamp and welcomes people to the golden shore, where they will not experience prejudice because of the color of their skin, the religious faith that they follow.”—Ruth Bader Ginsburg

32. “You would think with me living in Los Angeles I would go to the beach all the time, but we don’t. It’s the same as visiting the Statue of Liberty. If you don’t live in N.Y.C., it’s the first stop on your family vacation, but if you live there, you only go if you have relatives visiting from out of town.”—Marissa Jaret Winokur

33.“I love my kitchen. For Manhattan, I have a rather decent-size kitchen, and it has an opening that gives out to the dining room, which has a window with a view of the city and in the distance the Statue of Liberty.”—Mireille Guiliano

34. “I run from Horatio Street down just past Battery Park City and back. It’s amazing to run and see the Statue of Liberty and the ferries coming in. People think if you’re not near Central Park, there’s nowhere to go, but there’s a whole ecosystem happening down here.”—Andy Cohen

35. “Aye aye, I’m not one of these people that hate Christmas. Some people think it’s all fake, but I like that kind of thing. It’s like Las Vegas. I know this isnae really the Eiffel Tower and that isnae really the Statue of Liberty, but it’s just a bit of fun.”—Limmy

36.“The Statue of Liberty is no longer saying, ‘Give me your poor, your tired, your huddled masses.’ She’s got a baseball bat and yelling, ‘You want a piece of me?”—Robin Williams

37. “The last time I was inside a woman was when I went to the Statue of Liberty.”—Woody Allen

38. “No Statue of Liberty ever greeted our arrival in this country…we did not, in fact, come to the United States at all. The United States came to us.”—Luis Valdez

39.“I’ve always had a strong feeling for the Statue of Liberty, because it became the statue of my personal liberty.”—David Antin

40  “I grew up in New Jersey and never went up the Statue of Liberty.”—Buzz Aldrin

41.  “I launched Imperia at the Statue of Liberty because I wanted to use something symbolic. I like American society because it always wants to do something new and better.”—Roustam Tariko

42.  “United States: the country where liberty is a statue.”—Nicanor Parra

43.  “Jesus is magic, because he turned water into wine. I think he made the statue of liberty disappear in the 80s or something.”—Sarah Silverman

44.  “The American flag doesn’t give her glory on a peaceful, calm day. It’s when the winds pick up and become boisterous, do we see her strength. When she unfolds her hand, and shows her frayed fingers, where we see the stretch of red-blood lines of man that fought for this land. The purity of white stripes that strips our sins, and the stars of Abraham’s covenant, broad in a midnight blue sky. The rights our forefathers established. As it waves high in the currents of freedom, where the Torch of Liberty shines over the sea, does she give meaning to unity. When we strive as one nation, or when it drops half-mast, to a fallen soldier.”—Anthony Liccione

45.  “The main objects of all science, the freedom and happiness of man. . . . [are] the sole objects of all legitimate government.”—Thomas Jefferson

46.  “Don’t you think the Golden Gate Bridge looks to the East in the same way the Statue of Liberty faces Europe, the Old World?’ Mike now asked. ‘That the Bridge and the Statue face in opposite directions, the Bridge is the end whereas the Statue is the beginning?’
‘The Golden Gate Bridge should be understood symbolically,’ Foucault responded, ‘in the sense that it does not go from America back to America but that it should be something that could possibly open up out of America.”—Simeone Wade

47.  “If you want to humble an empire it makes sense to maim its cathedrals. They are symbols of its faith, and when they crumple and burn, it tells us we are not so powerful and we can’t be safe. The Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, planted at the base of Manhattan island with the Statue of Liberty as their sentry, and the Pentagon, a squat, concrete fort on the banks of the Potomac, are the sanctuaries of money and power that our enemies may imagine define us. But that assumes our faith rests on what we can buy and build, and that has never been America’s true God.”—Nancy Gibbs

48.  “When you look at what’s written under the Statue of Liberty, it’s the immigrant story. It’s about ‘bring me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.’ It’s not about ‘only bring me only your rich, your wealthy, your smart.”—Daniel Dae Kim

49.  “Luncheon of the Boating Party,’ owned by The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., has served Americans as a symbol of France and French culture, both of which I love, and is as evocative and triumphant an image as that other emissary of France, the Statue of Liberty.”—Susan Vreeland

50.  “Now there was no wonder in the Statue of Liberty illusion because he, Copperfield, attempted to do something so large that it stretched the credibility of the audience to the point where most people didn’t believe any of it anymore.”—Doug Henning

Video: 9 Secrets of the Statue of Liberty Most People Don’t Know

The Statue of Liberty is one of the mostfamous monuments in the world. Anyone visiting New York City can see her, but not everyone knows that Lady Liberty has her own secrets.

Or do you know, for example, that number seven meant a lot for the Statue’s creators? It’s easy to notice the Statue has seven spikes on its crown, symbolizing universal liberty across the seven oceans and continents. But there are less obvious references to the number seven.

You will also learn that she used to be a different color, she might have ties to the masonic, and many many more secrets!

Summary

It is evident that the Statue of Liberty acts as a symbol of universal unity. it connotes freedom and democracy and its very defined and refined ideologies have diffused beyond its territorial boundary with great acceptance. It is this statue that maintains the social equilibrium of Americans and by so doing, America has witnessed social, economic and political progress as exhibited by the above quotes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *